First Day of Azerbaijani Language Training

Mənim adım Karladır.
Onun adı Mikedir.

I learn that to say, “My name is Carla,” I have to add an ending on my name that sounds like “durr,” rhyming with burr. But for Mike or Amy, the “durr” ending changes to sound like “deer.”
And the difference, which comes up frequently, doesn’t depend on gender, or length of the name. To know when to use which ending, you just have to do it by sound. This is the Azerbaijani way of making their language flow smoothly, and sound good. It’s called vowel harmony. You can’t have this vowel next to that one, so change the subsequent one to fit in with the first.

I would soon learn other rules for harmony:

Drink tea. Lots of it.
No plain water, or you’ll get sick.

Respect people older than you.
Serve them and do what they say.

Call meals “bread.”
Never leave bread upside-down.

Wipe dust off of your shoes before you leave the house.
Say, “May we always meet in cleanliness” when someone emerges from the hamam.

Hang clothes shoulders down, overlapped just so.
Slice onions and tomatoes in the hand.

Prepare national meals exactly the way you were taught.
The more butter a meal has, the better.

Females, ask permission before leaving the house.